Un blog Travellerspoint

Pura Vida en Costa Rica (by : Manon)

sunny 26 °C
Voir Aventure 2011 2012 sur la carte de Abud Nantel.

We made it a point not overplan this trip, so aside from laying down major milestones (e.g. which countries we would visit, the major cities along our route and the volunteer programs we could be participating in), we never knew more than a few weeks ahead of time where exactly we would be or what we would be doing. As such, we had left our final month “open” for a few weeks of sun and surf somewhere warm… after so many weeks in the Andes, we had a hankering for some heat! So after much humming and hawing, we opted to head to Costa Rica… Why would one even hesitate you ask? Well, ecologically, Costa Rica has a lot in common with Ecuador – and it is at least twice a costly... So we weren’t sure this would be the best “bang for our buck”. On the other hand, Costa Rica’s reputation is such that we simply could not resist (and it had the advantage of getting us that much closer to home).

And then there was the matter of where to go in Costa Rica! All of sudden, making the right choice became more important because compared to the other parts of our trip, we were going to have much less time to explore the country! Seriously… we are totally spoiled.

So again, after much debate, we opted to rent a house for one month, in tiny Montezuma, on the tip of the Nicoya Peninsula (Northern, Pacific Coast). We flew into San Jose and were picked up by a hired van who, for an extra 40$, swung by the country’s only Sony store to see if they couldn’t salvage our Sony camera. You know the one: we bought it in Ecuador, it died in Peru and the “regional guarantee” that came with it was valid in 10 South American countries, excluding Peru, but including Costa Rica… Guess what? The Sony Store doesn’t fix cameras, but they were happy to give us a list of accredited repair centres. We had to choose between finding one of those centres in San Jose, a city of 1.5 million people with no street names, or missing our ferry to Montezuma… So off we went to Montezuma via highway, ferry and winding dirt roads!

P1020828.jpgP1020835.jpgP1020837.jpgP1020857.jpg

Montezuma… Population 350, plus the gringos who flock here for some of the country’s best surfing. Never have I seen such a concentration of dreads, tattoos, sunburns and surf boards. Totally laid back… Just what the doctor ordered, after 7 months of running around. We only had three goals for our stay here: rest, play on the beach, and catch up on the girls’ schoolwork (yes, by this point, we have fallen a bit behind… too many competing priorities!). To facilitate this, we rented the beautiful Casa Motmot, which is located in the jungle, 500m from the beach and between the villages of Montezuma (about 4km from the house) and Cabuya (about 3km away).

We arrived in the dead of night, during the week of the Supermoon… the tides were abnormally high, and we could hear the wave crashing ferociously on the shore as our driver weaved his way through the forest on a bumpy dirt road. It was raining. The girls were exhausted. We seemed to be lost, in the middle of nowhere… OMG, what have we done?

We were greeted at the house by our wonderful host, Donna, who quickly showed us around the house… two stories of dark precious wood, open on all sides to the forest around us, save for the bedrooms, kitchen and washrooms which have walls and screened windows. We quickly dumped our stuff, convinced the girls that no animals would attack them in their sleep, and literally passed out… until 5 the next morning, when were woken by the rising sun and a chorus of howler monkeys and parrots.

WOW!! Things suddenly looked much more promising… The property was stunningly beautiful, surrounded by a lush, green forest, teeming with life. We saw more wildlife hanging out on the second floor balcony than we’ve seen in most National Parks we’ve visited! Howler monkeys, white-faced capuchin monkeys, hummingbirds, agoutis, parrots, birds and more birds (not to mention Donna’s pet pig, Chuletta, who got her daily dose of watermelon peels and affection from the girls!)… Imagine living in a botanical garden.

P1030379.jpgP1030375.jpgP1030364.jpgP1030556.jpgP1030553.jpgP1030551.jpgP1030550.jpgP1030683.jpgP1030644.jpgP1030649.jpg
P1030820.jpgP1020861.jpgP1020862.jpgP1020863.jpgP1020894.jpgP1020900.jpgP1030022.jpgP1030165.jpgP1030168.jpgP1030328.jpgP1030280.jpgP1030353.jpg

And so many monkeys, everywhere!

P1030015.jpgP1030056.jpgP1030203.jpgP1030197.jpg

It was perfect, and we quickly settled into a comfortable routine of homework in the morning, lunch, and then short outings in the afternoon:

- the beach down the road, where Alain and the kids spent countless hours building mazes in which they tossed hundreds of hermit crabs;

P1030844.jpgP1030845.jpgP1030391.jpgP1030401.jpgP1020935.jpgP1020936.jpgP1020933.jpgP1020942.jpgP1020950.jpgP1020948.jpgP1030178.jpg

- the three-street village of Montezuma (by local bus or taxi), where we indulged in Ice Dream’s amazing homemade Italian ice cream;

P1030625.jpgP1030623.jpgP1030702.jpg

- nearby rivers for bird watching;

P1030814.jpgP1030760.jpgP1030042.jpgP1030043.jpgP1030048.jpg

- the beautiful Montezuma waterfall, which is the town’s other main attractions, along with surfing;

P1030723.jpgP1030725.jpgP1030736.jpgP1030745.jpg

- the Mariposario, a privately owned butterfly farm with a resident zoologist who gave us a fascinating insect tour;

P1030575.jpgP1030583.jpgP1030600.jpgP1030608.jpg

- Cabo Blanco National Park (the country’s very first National Park, on land which was donated by Swedish and Danish farmers), where we did a short hike to discover the local flora and fauna;

P1030071.jpgP1030073.jpgP1030075.jpgP1030079.jpgP1030078.jpgP1030082.jpgP1030090.jpgP1030093.jpgP1030096.jpgP1030098.jpgP1030110.jpgP1030101.jpgP1030114.jpg

- the Dutch-owned Hotel El Celaje, where a drink at the bar bought you the right to enjoy the pool when the surf was too rough for swimming (thank God for that pool!);

P1030161.jpgP1030132.jpgP1030133.jpgP1030135.jpgP1030139.jpgP1030140.jpgP1030147.jpgP1030149.jpgP1030164.jpg

- playing in chest-deep tide-pools, which were clear and warm like a bath;

P1030770.jpg

- a ride around Cabuya and the larger town of Cobano in Donna’s cool, green, antique Toyota LandCruiser;

P1030172.jpgP1030125.jpgP1030126.jpgP1030124.jpgP1030123.jpgP1030060.jpgP1030051.jpgP1030063.jpgP1030065.jpg

- beautiful Playa Grande… to reach this long, flat beach, one must walk along a series of other (rougher) beaches and through the forest for roughly 45 minutes, but the effort is worth it: it is pristine, isolated, bordered by picture-perfect palm trees… and most of the time, you are practically alone there.

P1030205.jpgP1030218.jpgP1030228.jpgP1030236.jpgP1020959.jpgP1020963.jpgP1020965.jpgP1020968.jpgP1020971.jpgP1020972.jpgP1020973.jpgP1020976.jpgP1020983.jpgP1020984.jpg

Playa Grande is also where we had our first surf lessons too (and some great boogy-boarding)! Alain went once on his own and enjoyed it so much – and made it look so easy – that the girls and I decided we wanted to try too. It was a hoot! And we were so, so proud of ourselves that we all were able to catch waves and stand on the board!

P1030243.jpgP1030248.jpgP1030184.jpgP1030253.jpgP1030258.jpgP1030255.jpgP1030266.jpgP1030262.jpgP1030261.jpgP1030448.jpgP1030474.jpgP1030508.jpgP1030480.jpg

Montezuma was just what the doctor ordered. We were enveloped by the mellowness of the town, and just hung out… We hadn’t seen the girls so mellow in a long time (if ever!). Running around the house in their underwear all day, having water fights with the garden hose, lounging in the hammocks. They took complete possession of the property and felt completely at home – they even built a zipline for their teddy bears, from the 2nd floor balcony to the big palm tree in the garden.

P1030807.jpgP1030810.jpgP1030791.jpg

However, the effects of the Supermoon lingered… while were able to swim on most days – and the water was basically at body temperature! – the waves were very strong. Moreover, frequent nighttime thunderstorms (beautiful!) generated storm swells the next day… The girls couldn’t go into the water on their own (except at Playa Grande) and even for Alain and I, it was a bit too much at times.

We therefore decided to abridge our time in Montezuma by a week, and head up the coast by taxi to Playa Samara, reputedly the country’s safest and most beautiful beach... This is the beginning of the rainy season, and the road to Samara was a fun one! Cattle roadblocks, crossing rivers, deep red earthen roads that wound and bumped...

P1030889.jpgP1030894.jpgP1030897.jpg

There, we rented a condo (from a New Brunswick Acadian, which we found on www.vrbo.com!) for 9 days. Again, we were between two villages – Puerto Carillo and Playa Samara – and just a few hundred meters from the beach, with a view on a beautiful lagoon… with the added benefit of having a very warm swimming pool on hand! The girls loved it. And Arianne made a new friend, the owner's 7 year-old daughter Katie.

P1040335.jpgP1040340.jpgP1040334.jpg

The beaches here were breathtakingly beautiful: crescent-shaped, flat, white, with long rolling waves under a clear blue sky. Samara is slightly bigger than Montezuma, and perhaps not quite so hippy-ish, but equally laid-back. Carillo is so tiny that when we took the bus to go visit, we almost missed the village… So the hanging out continued. Homework in the morning, and then pool and/or beach in the afternoon. Here, the hermit crab population was much lower, so Alain and the girls concentrated their efforts on advanced sand-village engineering. The final products invariably drew amazed gasps and applauses from the public!

P1030903.jpgP1030907.jpgP1030917.jpgP1030931.jpgP1030949.jpgP1030954.jpgP1030959.jpgP1040179.jpgP1040201.jpgP1040203.jpgP1040214.jpgP1040216.jpgP1040221.jpgP1040210.jpgP1040146.jpgP1040148.jpgP1040150.jpg[

We also indulged in a few extras here as well:

- An outing to Nosara, to experience the Miss Sky Canopy Tour – the world’s second largest zipline… 13 lines, the longest of which was 850m. It was fun! And of course, the scenery was breathtaking. The lines went from mountain to mountain, so you zipped like a bird over deep green valleys and through puffs of white clouds. Our guides were also hilarious, and one of them even manage to put on a gorilla costume, hide in the bushes… and scare the bejeezus out of us! It was sidesplitting!

P1040057.jpgP1040041.jpgP1040035.jpgP1040003.jpgP1030987.jpgP1030988.jpg

- On the way back from Nosara, we stopped along the way to visit small villages and beaches. Most stunning were Playa Pelada and the village of Playa Guiones.

img=http://photos.travellerspoint.com/416466/P1040089.jpg]P1040100.jpgP1040087.jpgP1040063.jpgP1040062.jpg

- One of our best dinners to date, at an Argentinian Parrillada restaurant in Carillo… who had a table-side pool. The girls believe every restaurant should offer such pool services!

And the best for last: a day of surfing in Samara. We all went for another round, and enjoyed as much if not more as the first time! It was one of those perfect days, with perfect light, a soft breeze, and a very full and happy heart…

P1040280.jpgP1040283.jpgP1040298.jpgP1040307.jpgP1040305.jpgP1040326.jpgP1040300.jpgP1040331.jpgP1040242.jpgP1040255.jpgP1040256.jpgP1040261.jpgP1040267.jpgP1040268.jpgP1040278.jpg

I have to say, I found it very difficult to pack our bags on this last day… Leaving Samara meant heading back to civilization… From here, we head to San Jose for four days and then… Home, James!

To soften the blow, we rented a car for a few days and made a few stops en route to San Jose:

- Jungle Crocodile Safari in Tarcoles, where we took a 1.5 hour boat tour on the Rio Tarcoles to do some serious birdwatching… and see the country’s largest crocodiles! The big alpha male was some 4 meters long!! Seeing our guide feed that monster a bite of chicken was akin to watching someone jump of a bridge from afar: a silent voice in your head screaming “Noooooooo! Don’t do it!”. He says he only got bitten once…

P1040381.jpgP1040442.jpgP1040446.jpgP1040399.jpgP1040467.jpg

- Carrara National Park, where we hired a guide for a two-hour hike in the forest, in search of the park’s star: the scarlet macaws. Let it be know that paying for the services of a nature guide is always worth it! Without them, you see lots of pretty trees. With them, you see macaws, white bats, monkeys, cool insects, and many other things… The only thing that went wrong was the thunderstorm that sent the girls reeling. They had enough!! But Alain and I were hell-bent on squeezing every drop of nature time we could out of these last few days, so they had to follow along… and earned a bottle of Fanta each as reward for their attempts at patience!

P1040470.jpgP1040474.jpgP1040492.jpgP1040496.jpgP1040525.jpgP1040519.jpg

And so we finally made it to San Jose… Did I mention that metro San Jose has 1.5 million population and no street names? Driving here is CRAZY! Directions to get from point A to point B (as in, how to find our hotel) go something like this: take the exit for the Best Western Irazu, go east 300m and then south for 100m. Simple, right? Despite having a GPS on hand, we got lost 3 times and it took one hour to find the damn place! I definitely prefer natural wilderness over urban wilderness...

Posté par Abud Nantel 15:03 Archivé dans Costa Rica Tagué costa_rica montezuma samara nosara Commentaires (1)

Samara Beach (par : Chloée)

sunny 29 °C
Voir Aventure 2011 2012 sur la carte de Abud Nantel.

On est au Costa Rica, à Samara, où il y a une des plages les plus ‘kid-friendly’ du Costa Rica. La plage est ‘kid-friendly’ parce qu’il y a un gros récif de corail qui brise les vagues. La plage est très jolie, car il y a pleins de corail sur la plage qu’on peut utiliser pour s’amuser. Pour les châteaux de sable, le sable est vraiment bon car il est vraiment dur, alors on fait pleins de constructions comme une église, un château-fort, un cimetière, un parc, des murailles et pleins d’autres choses…

P1030940.jpgP1030938.jpgP1030927.jpgP1030907.jpgP1040171.jpgP1040174.jpgP1040179.jpgP1040146.jpg

L’appartement où on vit a une grande piscine. Tous les jours, on vient se rincer après la plage et des fois, on fait des journées de piscine. La piscine est vraiment chaude, parce qu’à midi, le soleil est vraiment chaud… des fois, la piscine est comme un bain chaud! L’appartement a deux chambres : Arianne et moi, on couche dans une chambre (mais pas dans le même lit!) et l’autre chambre, c’est maman et papa. Du balcon, on peut voir un étang et des fois, on peut voir des crocodiles dans l’étang. Il y a aussi pleins d’oiseaux qu’on peut observer ici et il y a plein de vautours. Une fois, on a vu des singes hurleurs à 50m de nous, quand on était dans la piscine.

P1040340.jpgP1040341.jpgP1040337.jpgP1040335.jpgP1040336.jpg

Les villages autour sont Samara, à 4km, et Carillo, à 5km. Samara est un peu comme Montezuma, mais les gens de Montezuma disent que c’est gros… Pour nous, c’est petit – très petit! C’est un petit village de plage, avec quelques petites épiceries, quelques restaurants et des taxis. Comme à Montezuma, quand on va à Samara, on prend presque toujours une crème glacée – mais elle est moins bonne qu’à Montezuma! Carillo, c’est encore plus petit que Montezuma… Il y a seulement une rue, deux magasins, deux restaurants et une plage. On n’y est allé qu’une fois, à un restaurant de viandes d’Argentine. Ils avaient une piscine, alors pendant qu’on commandait (parce que ça prenait longtemps), on est allé jouer dans la piscine! Le repas était très bon!

Ma chose préférée qu’on a fait ici c’est allé au Zipline. Ce zipline est le plus gros du monde, et le deuxième plus long. Le plus long fil qu’on a fait était 850m. Quand on était en haut des montagnes, on pouvait voir une chute, une rivière, des arbres… beaucoup d’arbres! Ça allait vite! Il y a deux lignes qu’on pouvait faire toutes seules (Arianne et moi), mais le reste, il fallait les faire avec un guide. Quand on était avec le guide, moi et Arianne et le guide le plus comique, on faisait un train. À l’avant-dernière zipline, on pouvait aller visiter une chute et se baigner mais on ne s’est pas baigné parce que l’eau était brune, à cause de la pluie de la nuit dernière. Quand on revenait de la chute, ils nous ont fait une blague : un des guides a dit qu’il y avait un nid de colibri, mais quand on essayait de regarder, un autre guide avait mis un costume de gorille et il s’était caché dans la forêt… quand tout le monde était vraiment proche de lui, il est sorti des arbres en faisant le bruit d’un gorille. Personne ne savait qu’il était là et il nous a fait peur! Tout le monde a crié, même papa qui n’a jamais peur!

P1030995.jpgP1040005.jpgP1040020.jpgP1040057.jpg

Samara est une belle place où aller. C’est un peu cher, mais c’est beau.

Posté par Abud Nantel 16:37 Archivé dans Costa Rica Commentaires (2)

À Montezuma, Costa Rica (par : Arianne)

sunny 28 °C
Voir Aventure 2011 2012 sur la carte de Abud Nantel.

Notre maison était dans la jungle, mais pas loin des plages. Notre maison était faite en bois et les murs étaient ouverts. Il y avait deux hamacs couchés et un hamac assis. Il y avait aussi trois chambres : une pour les parents, une pour Chloée et une pour moi. La première nuit, on a dormi ensemble dans la chambre de Chloée parce qu’elle avait deux lits simples et dans la mienne, il y avait un lit double – on a dormi ensemble la première nuit, pour s’habituer à la maison parce que la maison était différente de ce qu’on connaît…

P1030364.jpgP1030379.jpgP1030375.jpgP1030551.jpg

On entendait pleins de bruits dans la jungle, comme le bruit des criquets. Le matin, les singes hurleurs nous réveillaient à cinq heures du matin et les perroquets criaient sans arrêt. Il y avait aussi des singes capucins à face blanche, pleins de papillons, des oiseaux et pleins d’insectes. Un agouti, c’est comme un gros écureuil avec pas de queue – il marche à quatre pattes, il a la grosseur d’un petit chien, et il mange des graines de tournesol qu’on lui lançait chaque matin. Un soir, on a vu cinq ratons laveurs qui sont venus manger les graines de l’agouti parce qu’il en restait plein. La nuit, il y avait aussi des gros crapauds qui venaient dans notre maison, mais ils ne pouvaient pas venir dans la cuisine ou dans nos chambres parce que ces pièces avaient des portes et que les crapauds ne pouvaient pas monter en haut sur les escaliers : le reste de la maison était ouvert.

P1030353.jpgP1030357.jpgP1030042.jpgP1030022.jpgP1030404.jpgP1030608.jpgP1030600.jpgP1030601.jpgP1030584.jpgP1030575.jpgP1030417.jpgP1030325.jpgP1030328.jpg

On voyait des animaux partout et pleins d’oiseaux. L’oiseau que j’ai le plus aimé, il était bleu, avec la bedaine blanche, et une queue bleue sur la tête.

P1020919.jpg

Dans la famille des singes, celui que j’ai le plus aimé, c’était le singe capucin à face blanche.

P1030011.jpgP1030007.jpgP1030015.jpgP1030014.jpg

En plus, les propriétaires de la maison avaient un petit cochon noir qui s'appellait 'Chuletta' (ça veux dire 'côtelette de porc'!).

P1030280.jpg

Dans notre jardin, il y avait des arbres à caramboles (‘star fruit’), des bananiers, des cocotiers et pleins de fleurs.

P1030553.jpgP1030365.jpgP1030644.jpg

La plage à côté de notre maison avait beaucoup de vagues, mais à marée basse, on pouvait se baigner. À notre plage, on faisait aussi des chasses aux Bernard l’Hermite – ce sont des petits crabes qui vivent dans des coquillages, et quand ils sont trop gros pour leur maison, ils changent de coquillage. Alain faisait des trous dans le sable, assez gros et avec des murs assez à pics, pour que les Bernard l’Hermite ne puissent pas en sortir. Pendant ce temps, moi et Chloée on allait cueillir des Bernard l’Hermite et on les mettait dans ce trou (à l’heure, on pouvait cueillir à peu près 100 Bernard l’Hermite). Pendant que nous on les ramassait, Alain faisait une grosse structure compliquée comme un labyrinthe, avec des montagnes de sable et des ponts qu’il fabriquait avec un morceau de bois, avec du sable par-dessus. La dernière structure qu’on a fait, il y avait les Chutes du Niagara et les Bernard l’Hermite ne le savaient pas : il montait sur un chemin, disait ‘Oh! Oh! On est libres!’ et arrivaient aux chutes… et ils tombaient en bas!

P1020947.jpgP1020936.jpgP1030391.jpgP1030392.jpgP1030401.jpgP1030844.jpg

La seule belle plage, où il n’y avait pas beaucoup de vagues, c’était Playa Grande. Il fallait passer à travers Montezuma pour y aller. Montezuma, c’est juste deux rues : une rue pour entrer dans le village, et une autre, pour aller d’un bout à l’autre. Ça fait comme un ‘T’. Pour aller à Playa Grande, on traversait le village (ça prenait à peu près 2 minutes!) et ensuite, on prenait un chemin qui allait sur la plage, dans la forêt, sur la plage, dans la forêt (parce que des fois, il y avait des roches et ils faisaient un chemin dans la forêt pour qu’on puisse passer)… C’est une plage protégée, et on ne peut pas y aller en auto. Ça nous prenait à peu près 40 minutes pour marcher là-bas, mais il y a des gens qui pouvaient le faire en 25 minutes.

P1030791.jpgP1030774.jpgP1030770.jpgP1030411.jpgP1030254.jpgP1030240.jpgP1030218.jpgP1030002.jpgP1020968.jpgP1020972.jpgP1020971.jpgP1020963.jpgP1020957.jpg

Playa Grande s’appelle comme ça, parce que c’est une plage qui est très grande et elle n’est pas en pente, tandis que les autres sont toutes en pente. Si la plage est en pente, les vagues seront beaucoup plus grosses. À Playa Grande, on a fait chacun une leçon de surf, et papa en a fait deux. Le surf était amusant, mais plus la marée montait, plus la mer était ‘rough’. Pour passer par-dessus les vagues qui n’étaient pas bonnes pour faire du surf, l’instructeur levait notre planche et quand on retombait, ça faisait mal au ventre parce qu’on retombait fort! On a tous réussi à se lever sur notre planche : moi, Chloée, Alain et Manon. Pour la première fois, j’ai eu peur quand je me suis levée. Après, je me suis habituée et c’était amusant. J’étais très fière de moi d’avoir réussi à faire du surf!

P1030508.jpgP1040331.jpgP1040326.jpgP1040298.jpgP1040283.jpgP1040280.jpg1P1040297.jpgP1040300.jpgP1040311.jpg

J’ai aimé ça vivre là-bas, parce que j’aimais ça voir les singes souvent. On était bien et on était tranquille… sauf quand les singes hurleurs nous réveillaient à cinq heures du matin! Et à chaque fois qu'on allait à Montezuma, on achetait une crème glacée italienne. C'était la meilleure crème glacée depuis le début de notre voyage en Amérique du sud! Ma sorte préférée, c'était 'giampa' - c'est de la crème glacée, avec des gros céréales au chocolat et à la vanille dedans. Il y avait aussi chocolat noir, menthe et chocolat, chocolat au lait, et à la crème. Yum! Yum!

P1030133.jpgP1030140.jpg

Posté par Abud Nantel 08:37 Archivé dans Costa Rica Tagué costa_rica montezuma Commentaires (5)

Entrevue Voyage - Partie 3 : Chloée et Arianne

semi-overcast 28 °C
Voir Aventure 2011 2012 sur la carte de Abud Nantel.

QUESTIONS POUR LES FILLES
(de notre lectrice et grande amie Caroline Kealey)

DSC03742.jpg

Q : COMMENT TROUVEZ-VOUS L'EXPÉRIENCE DE L'ÉCOLE À LA MAISON?

C : Bien, mais des fois, c’est difficile de travailler quand on est tout seul, sans amis. Ce que j’aime, c’est qu’on fait moins d’heures.

A : J’aime ça, sauf que des fois, je suis tannée de faire toujours la même chose. Mais c’est amusant, parce qu’on fait beaucoup moins d’heures et le reste de la journée, on peut faire d’aures choses.

Q : EST-CE QUE VOS PARENTS FONT DE BONS PROFS?

C : Maman est bonne en français et Papa est bon en mathématiques.

A : Ils font de bons profs, mais des fois, j’aime pas ça travailler avec maman et papa et j’aimerais mieux être en classe.

Q : EST-CE QU'IL Y A DES CHOSES QUI VOUS SURPRENNENT QUE MAMAN ET PAPA NE CONNAISSENT PAS DANS LE CURRICULUM DE 3E ET 5E ANNÉE?

C : les multiplications de gros chiffres par gros chiffres, comme 54 x 7…

A : ils ne savaient pas quel sujet me donner pour la rédaction de ma marche à suivre en français.

Q : AVEZ-VOUS APPRIS À PARLER L'ESPAGNOL?

C : Oui, mail il y a encore des mots qu’on ne sait pas. Quand les gens parlent trop vite, je ne comprend rien – il faut qu’ils parlent lentement. J’aime le mot ‘helado’!

A : Oui, on a appris des phrases. La phrase que j’aime le plus c’est ‘Yo quiero helado’ et ‘Yo quiero caramelos’. Celle que j’utilise le plus souvent pour des cochonneries, c’est ‘Cuanto vale?’ – surtout à l’aéroport, Manon et Alain disent non, parce que c’est trop cher!

Q : S'IL FALLAIT RACONTER JUSTE UNE DE VOS AVENTURES QUE VOUS AVEZ LE PLUS ADORÉE À VOS AMIS AU CANADA, QUELLE CHOISIRIEZ VOUS?

C : Notre voyage au Galapagos, parce que c’était tellement différent de chez-nous. Les animaux sont complètement différents : il y a des tortues géantes, des ‘blue footed boobies’ (oiseaux)… Le plus spécial, c’était de nager avec des otaries, des requins et des raies mantas.

A : Les Galapagos. J’ai aimé les Galapagos parce qu’on pouvait faire du snorkeling partout et voir des poissons, et j’aime voir les poissons. Quand on était sur la croisière, on est allé faire du snorkeling avec des beaux poissons, des requins, des Golden Rays, des Manta Rays et des Eagle Rays. On a vu des requins marteaux, des requins des Galapagos, des requins à pointe blanche et des requins à pointe noire.

Q : ON SAIT QUE SOUVENT, ÇA PEUT ARRIVER QUE LES ENFANTS (ET LES ADULTES!) OUBLIENT DES CHOSES, SURTOUT EN VOYAGE … AVEZ VOUS OUBLIÉ DES OBJETS PENDANTS VOS GRANDS VOYAGES ET AVEZ-VOUS PU LES RETROUVER OU LES REMPLACER?

C : Il y a une vague qui a emporté mon masque de plongée, sur la plage de Montezuma, au Costa Rica. On va le remplacer au Canada.

A : J’ai oublié mon marque-page d’Obélix (souvenir du Parc Astérix) à Paris chez des amis, mais ils vont l’envoyer par la poste au Canada.

Posté par Abud Nantel 20:10 Archivé dans Costa Rica Commentaires (1)

Entrevue Voyage - Partie 2 : Alain

semi-overcast 28 °C
Voir Aventure 2011 2012 sur la carte de Abud Nantel.

QUESTIONS POUR ALAIN
(de notre lectrice et grande amie Caroline Kealey)

P1020335.jpg

Q : EST-CE QUE ÇA A ÉTÉ DIFFICILE POUR TOI – COMME GARS – DE PASSER NEUF MOIS DANS LA COMPAGNIE DE FILLES? AS-TU APPRIS DES CHOSES SUR LE SEXE FÉMININ?

A : Euh… Oui. J’ai appris que je vais passer beaucoup de temps à magasiner dans les magasins de filles… et que c’est difficile d’en sortir une fois entré!

Q : DANS LES MOIS AVANT LE VOYAGE, TU NOUS AVAIS RACONTÉ EN DÉTAIL TOUTE LA PLANIFICATION REQUISE POUR PRÉPARER LES VALISES POUR CHAQUE MEMBRE DE LA FAMILLE ET CHOISIR SEULEMENT LES ITEMS ESSENTIELS ET PORTATIFS. EST-CE QU'IL Y A DES CHOSES QUE TU CHANGERAIS (ADDITIONS OU CHOSES À ÉLIMINER) SI C'ÉTAIT À REFAIRE?

A : Je prendrais des sacs plus petits pour être obligé de prendre moins de choses! J’essaierais d’alléger les sacs, mais par contre, on a pas mal tout utilisé ce qu’on avait apporté.

Q : ENCORE AU NIVEAU DE PLANIFICATION, EST-CE QUE LE BUDGET QUE VOUS AVIEZ ÉTABLIT POUR LE VOYAGE ÉTAIT JUSTE? COMMENT FAITES-VOUS POUR GÉRER L'ASPECT FINANCIER DE VOTRE VOYAGE COMPTE TENU DE TOUS LES DÉPLACEMENTS ET LES RÉGIONS ÉLOIGNÉES QUE VOUS VISITEZ?

A : En général, tout a couté un peu plus cher que prévu. Mais par contre, les billets d’avion ont couté beaucoup moins cher – le truc, c’est de prendre des billets ‘multi-city’, car ça réduit de beaucoup le prix total. C’est ça qui nous a permis d’équilibrer notre budget. La partie la plus dispendieuse de tout le voyage, par contre, c’est de rentrer vivre au Canada pour l’été. C’est pour cette raison que j’ai réduit mon année sabbatique de 12 mois à 10 mois et demi, et que je rentre au travail en août.

Q : ARRIVE-TU À FAIRE DU SPORT OU DE L'EXERCICE? QU'EST-CE QUI TE GARDE EN SANTÉ (À PART SANS DOUTE DES KILOMÈTRES DE MARCHE!)

A : Non, je n’ai pas réussi à faire de sport… et les quelques fois que j’en ai fait (par exemple, jouer quelques parties de soccer avec les gens des villages où nous sommes restés en Équateur et au Pérou), j’ai découvert que j’ai perdu énormément de ‘cardio’!! Mon sport principal a consisté a transporté les bagages – et les filles, quand elles étaient fatiguées de marcher!!

Posté par Abud Nantel 20:06 Archivé dans Costa Rica Commentaires (0)

(Articles 6 - 10 sur 105) « Page 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 .. »